Category : General

Hardware and Software Requirements for SharePoint 2013

Applies to: SharePoint Server 2013, SharePoint Foundation 2013

Summary: Lists the minimum hardware and software requirements to install and run SharePoint 2013 with Service Pack 1.

In this article:

 

Important

The information in this article applies to SharePoint Foundation 2013 and SharePoint Server 2013. For information about the features that each version supports, see the SharePoint 2013 Product Page.
Some of the hardware requirement values in this article are based on test results from SharePoint 2010 Products and still apply to SharePoint 2013. This article will be updated with appropriate values and republished when new data becomes available. Hardware requirement values obtained from SharePoint 2010 Products that are listed in this article do not apply to search in SharePoint 2013.
This article links to SharePoint 2010 Products guidance where that guidance is still valid. The SharePoint 2010 Products guidance is not applicable for search in SharePoint 2013 because the search architecture has changed significantly.
The hardware and software requirements in this article refer to physical and virtual servers in a SharePoint farm.

SharePoint 2013 provides for several installation scenarios. Currently, these installations include single server with built-in database installations, single-server farm installations, and multiple-server farm installations. This article describes the hardware and software requirements for SharePoint 2013 in each of these scenarios.

Hardware and software requirements for other SharePoint 2013 capabilities

If you plan to use capabilities that are offered through SharePoint 2013 or through other integration channels, such as SQL Server or Exchange Server, you also need to meet the hardware and software requirements that are specific to that capability. The following list provides links to hardware and software requirements for some SharePoint 2013 capabilities:

Hardware requirements – location of physical servers

Some enterprises have data centers that are located in close proximity to one another and are connected by high-bandwidth fiber optic links. In this environment it is possible to configure the two data centers as a single farm. This distributed farm topology is called a stretched farm. Stretched farms for SharePoint 2013 are supported as of April 2013.

For a stretched farm architecture to work as a supported high-availability solution, the following prerequisites must be met:

  • There is a highly consistent intra-farm latency of <1ms one way, 99.9% of the time over a period of ten minutes. (Intra-farm latency is commonly defined as the latency between the front-end web servers and the database servers.)
  • The bandwidth speed must be at least 1 gigabit per second.

To provide fault tolerance in a stretched farm, use the standard best practice guidance to configure redundant service applications and databases. For more information, see Create a high availability architecture and strategy for SharePoint 2013.

 

Hardware requirements—web servers, application servers, and single server installations

The values in the following table are minimum values for installations on a single server with a built-in database and for web and application servers that are running SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 in a single / multiple server farm installation under a Windows Server 2012 environment.

Please note: you must have sufficient hard disk space for the base installation and sufficient space for diagnostics such as logging, debugging, creating memory dumps, and so on. For production use, you must also have additional free disk space for day-to-day operations.

In addition, maintain five times as much free space as you have RAM for development, UAT & production environments.

Installation Scenario Deployment type and scale RAM Processor Hard disk space
Web server in a three-tier farmPilot, user acceptance test deployment of SharePoint Server 2013 or SharePoint Foundation 2013.16 GB64-bit, 4 cores250 GB for system drive
Application server in a three-tier farmProduction, user acceptance test, or production deployment of SharePoint Server 2013 or SharePoint Foundation 2013.32 GB64-bit, 4 cores250 GB for system drive

Hardware requirements – database servers

The requirements in the following table apply to database servers in environments that have multiple servers in the farm.

Note: The requirements listed in this section apply to SQL Server 2014.

Component Minimum requirement
Processor64-bit, 8 cores for small deployments (fewer than 1,000 users)
RAM• 64 GB for small deployments (fewer than 1,000 users) These values are larger than those recommended as the minimum values for SQL Server because of the distribution of data that is required for a SharePoint 2013 environment..
Hard disk500 GB for system drive

Software requirements

The requirements in the following section apply to the following installations:

  • Single server with built-in database
  • Server farm with a single server in the farm
  • Server farm with multiple servers in the farm
Important:
SharePoint 2013 does not support single label domain names. For more information, see Information about configuring Windows for domains with single-label DNS names.

The Microsoft SharePoint Products Preparation Tool can assist you in the installation of the software prerequisites for SharePoint 2013. Ensure that you have an Internet connection, because some prerequisites are installed from the Internet. For more information about how to use the Microsoft SharePoint Products Preparation Tool, see Install SharePoint 2013 on a single server with SQL Server and Install SharePoint 2013 across multiple servers for a three-tier farm.

Note:
SQL Server 2014 requires the May 2014 Cumulative Update to be installed. To install the May 2014 Cumulative Update see Updates to SharePoint 2013.
Note:
Windows Server 2012 R2 is only supported on a SharePoint Server 2013 Service Pack 1 environment. For additional information about Windows Server 2012 R2 support, see SharePoint 2013 SP1 support in Windows Server 2012 R2.

Minimum software requirements

This section provides minimum software requirements for each server in the farm.

Minimum requirements for a database server in a farm:

  • One of the following:
    • The 64-bit edition of Microsoft SQL Server 2012.
    • The 64-bit edition of SQL Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1
  • The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Standard, Enterprise, or Datacenter or the 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2012 Standard or Datacenter
  • The SharePoint parsing process crashes in Windows Server 2008 R2 (KB 2554876)
  • FIX: IIS 7.5 configurations are not updated when you use the ServerManager class to commit configuration changes (KB 2708075)
  • Hotfix: ASP.NET (SharePoint) race condition in .NET 4.5 RTM:
    • Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 (KB 2759112)
    • Windows Server 2012 (KB 2765317)
  • Microsoft .NET Framework version 4.5

Minimum requirements for a single server with built-in database:

  • The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Standard, Enterprise, or Datacenter or the 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2012 Standard or Datacenter
  • The SharePoint parsing process crashes in Windows Server 2008 R2 (KB 2554876)
  • FIX: IIS 7.5 configurations are not updated when you use the ServerManager class to commit configuration changes (KB 2708075)
  • Hotfix: ASP.NET (SharePoint) race condition in .NET 4.5 RTM:
    • Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 (KB 2759112)
    • Windows Server 2012 (KB 2765317)
  • The Setup program installs the following prerequisite for a single server with built-in database:
    • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 – Express Edition
  • The Microsoft SharePoint Products Preparation Tool installs the following prerequisites for a single server with built-in database:
    • Web Server (IIS) role
    • Application Server role
    • Microsoft .NET Framework version 4.5
    • SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 Native Client
    • Microsoft WCF Data Services 5.0
    • Microsoft Information Protection and Control Client (MSIPC)
    • Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 SP1 (x64)
    • Windows Management Framework 3.0 which includes Windows PowerShell 3.0
    • Windows Identity Foundation (WIF) 1.0 and Microsoft Identity Extensions (previously named WIF 1.1)
    • Windows Server AppFabric
    • Cumulative Update Package 1 for Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server (KB 2671763)

Minimum requirements for front-end web servers and application servers in a farm:

  • The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Standard, Enterprise, or Datacenter or the 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2012 Standard or Datacenter.
  • The SharePoint parsing process crashes in Windows Server 2008 R2 (KB 2554876)
  • FIX: IIS 7.5 configurations are not updated when you use the ServerManager class to commit configuration changes (KB 2708075)
  • Hotfix: ASP.NET (SharePoint) race condition in .NET 4.5 RTM:
    • Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 (KB 2759112)
    • Windows Server 2012 (KB 2765317)
  • The Microsoft SharePoint Products Preparation Tool installs the following prerequisites for front-end web servers and application servers in a farm:
    • Web Server (IIS) role
    • Application Server role
    • Microsoft .NET Framework version 4.5
    • SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 Native Client
    • Microsoft WCF Data Services 5.0
    • Microsoft Information Protection and Control Client (MSIPC)
    • Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 SP1 (x64)
    • Windows Management Framework 3.0 which includes Windows PowerShell 3.0
    • Windows Identity Foundation (WIF) 1.0 and Microsoft Identity Extensions (previously named WIF 1.1)
    • Windows Server AppFabric
    • Cumulative Update Package 1 for Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server (KB 2671763)

Minimum requirements for client computers

Minimum recommended services for development environments

The following are the minimum SharePoint 2013 services and service applications that are recommended for development environments:

  • App Management service application
  • Central Administration web site
  • Claims to Windows Token service (C2WTS)
  • Distributed cache service
  • Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2013 Site and Subscription Settings service
  • Secure Store Service
  • User Profile service application (SharePoint Server 2013 only)

Optional software

The optional software in this section is supported but is not required to install or use SharePoint 2013. This software might be required by capabilities such as business intelligence. For more information about system requirements for other capabilities, see Hardware and software requirements for other SharePoint 2013 capabilities.

Environment Optional software
Single server with built-in database, front-end web servers, and application servers in a farm• .NET Framework Data Provider for SQL Server (part of Microsoft .NET Framework) • .NET Framework Data Provider for OLE DB (part of Microsoft .NET Framework) • Workflow Manager You can install Workflow Manager on a dedicated computer. • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Reporting Services Add-in for Microsoft SharePoint Technologies This add-in is used by Access Services for SharePoint 2013. • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Data-Tier Application (DAC) Framework 64-bit edition • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Transact-SQL ScriptDom 64-bit edition • Microsoft System CLR Types for Microsoft SQL Server 2012 64-bit edition • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 with Service Pack 1 (SP1) LocalDB 64-bit edition • Microsoft Data Services for the .NET Framework 4 and Silverlight 4 (formerly ADO.NET Data Services) • Exchange Web Services Managed API, version 1.2 • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Remote Blob Store which is part of the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Feature Pack • SQL Server 2008 R2 Analysis Services ADOMD.NET • KB 2472264 If you are running a geo-distributed deployment and your servers are running Windows Server 2008 R2, then installing KB 2472264 can optimize network latency in a dedicated datacenter network. For more information, and to download the software, see You cannot customize some TCP configurations by using the netsh command in Windows Server 2008 R2
Client computer• Windows 7 For information about how to use Windows 7 with SharePoint 2013 in a development environment, see Start: Set up the development environment for SharePoint 2013. • Silverlight 3 • Office 2013 • Microsoft Office 2010 with Service Pack 2 With KB 2553248 • Microsoft Office 2007 with Service Pack 2 With KB 2583910 • Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 with Service Pack 1 • Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac version 12.2.9 Support ends April 9, 2013.

Links to applicable software

To install Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, Windows Server 2012, SQL Server, or SharePoint 2013, you can go to the web sites that are listed in this section. You can install most software prerequisites through the SharePoint 2013 Start page. The software prerequisites are also available from web sites that are listed in this section. You can enable the Web Server (IIS) role and the Application Server role in Server Manager.

In scenarios where installing prerequisites directly from the Internet is not possible you can download the prerequisites and then install them from a network share. For more information, see Install prerequisites for SharePoint 2013 from a network share.

Prerequisite installer operations and command-line options

The SharePoint 2013 prerequisite installer (prerequisiteinstaller.exe) installs the following software, if it has not already been installed on the target server, in this order:

  1. Microsoft .NET Framework version 4.5
  2. Windows Management Framework 3.0
  3. Application Server Role, Web Server (IIS) Role
  4. Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 Native Client
  5. Windows Identity Foundation (KB974405)
  6. Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 SP1 (x64)
  7. Windows Identity Extensions
  8. Microsoft Information Protection and Control Client
  9. Microsoft WCF Data Services 5.0
  10. Windows Server AppFabric
  11. Cumulative Update Package 1 for Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server (KB 2671763)

You can run prerequisiteinstaller.exe at a command prompt with the following options. When you run prerequisiteinstaller.exe at a command prompt, you may be asked to restart the server one or more times during the installation process. After rebooting, you should continue the prerequisite installation by running prerequisiteinstaller.exe with the /continue option.

  • /? Display command-line options
  • /continue This is used to tell the installer that it is continuing from a restart
  • /unattended No user interaction

The installer installs from the file that you specify in the command-line options described in the following list. In this list, <file> signifies the file from which you want to install. If you do not specify the <file> option, the installer downloads the file from the Internet and installs it. If the option does not apply to the current operating system, it is ignored.

  • /SQLNCli:<file> Install Microsoft SQL Server 2008 SP1 Native Client from <file>
  • /PowerShell:<file> Install Windows Management Framework 3.0 from <file>
  • /NETFX:<file> Install Microsoft .NET Framework version 4.5 from <file>
  • /IDFX:<file> Install Windows Identity Foundation (KB974405) from <file>
  • /IDFX11:<file> Install Windows Identity Foundation v1.1 from <file>
  • /Sync:<file> Install Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime SP1 v1.0 (x64) from <file>
  • /AppFabric:<file> Install Windows Server AppFabric from <file> (AppFabric must be installed with the options /i CacheClient,CachingService,CacheAdmin /gac)
  • /KB2671763:<file> Install Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server (AppFabric 1.1) from <file>
  • /MSIPCClient:<file> Install Microsoft Information Protection and Control Client from <file>
  • /WCFDataServices:<file> Install Microsoft WCF Data Services from <file>

Installation options

Certain prerequisites are installed by the prerequisite installer with specific options. Those prerequisites with specific installation options are listed below with the options that are used by the prerequisite installer.

  • Windows AppFabric

/i CacheClient,CachingService,CacheAdmin /gac

  • Microsoft WCF Data Services

/quiet

The prerequisite installer creates log files at %TEMP%prerequisiteinstaller.<date>.<time>.log. You can check these log files for specific details about all changes the installer makes to the target computer.

 

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Benefits of Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has a number of benefits from improved data security to greater flexibility allowing employees to work remotely. Find out how cloud solutions could help your business.

What are the principle benefits of cloud computing for businesses?

Cloud computing has been around for some years now, initially as a somewhat hazy concept to describe the move from on-premise to off-premise IT, and in more recent times, as a more defined hosted service delivery model. Greater numbers of businesses – both large and small – are now choosing to embrace the cloud, eager to make the most of their IT budgets and maximise return on investment.

While some have committed to a full-scale overhaul of their IT setup from the outset, others have dipped their toes in the water by testing cloud services for non-critical functions. Having experienced success with their initial deployment, many have embarked on a wider rollout of hosted services – to either complement or replace their existing infrastructure. And the positive reports have not gone unnoticed by other companies, who – conscious of the success their rivals have experienced in the cloud – have recognised the potential value in their own upgrade.

Cloud computing can benefit companies in a number of ways, depending upon their size, scale, sector and strategic goals. Here are five of the top advantages of sourcing IT services in the cloud:

Lower capital expenditure

The ability to source IT services on-demand – as and when they are required – allows businesses to move to an investment model based on operational expenditure. No longer are they required to commit to large-scale capital projects, spending thousands on servers and software licences which may only have a limited lifespan. When businesses source IT services in the cloud, it is the vendor that takes responsibility for the majority of the infrastructure. Businesses simply become consumers of IT services rather than the owners of the hardware.

Easier maintenance and upgrades

Cloud computing provider is responsible for server, software and network management, in-house IT professionals can be allocated other work. No longer do they need to spend all day simply keeping the company’s PC fleet working properly. Cloud vendors employ dedicated teams of experts whose sole responsibility is ensuring continuity of service. In terms of upgrades, these are provided at the vendor-end, rather than in-house, which saves both time and money for cloud users. When the cloud provider invests in new solutions, these are made available to customers, enabling them to access advanced tools and applications at no extra cost.

Greater flexibility and mobility

cloud services at their fingertips, employees can work from almost any location. They can access important files, data, documents and IT tools from a range of devices from almost any connected location. Providing they have the required bandwidth, it is possible to work online, replicating the office environment and ensuring employees can work as productively as possible.

Last year, a study conducted by IDG highlighted the range of services utilised by business employees in the cloud. These included work email (94 per cent), office apps (76 per cent) virtual private network server (75 per cent), databases (72 per cent), archives (55 per cent), production systems (55 per cent), CRM (47 per cent) and video conferencing (25 per cent).

Continuity of business

An associated benefit of remote working capability is the fact that, in the event of a disaster, the continuity of operations should never be in doubt. Should there be a fire, flood, theft, technology outage, or snow and ice prevent people from making it into the office, they have the option of working from a different location. Employees can simply log on as normal, access their work desktop, and continue as they would have done on any normal working day. All documents, files and data are hosted in the cloud, meaning they are accessible from almost any system, providing the user has the necessary access codes.

Improved IT security

In the early days of the cloud, concerns over the security of data hosted off-site were seen as a notable inhibitor to service adoption. However, as cloud computing has matured, and businesspeople have gained more of an understanding as to how it works, many of these fears have been allayed.

Rather than weakening IT security, there is a case for saying that cloud computing improves companies’ defences. This is because of the huge amount of money cloud providers spend on securing their data centre infrastructure, and keeping their customers’ data safe. Vendors benefit from economies of scale – they can afford to invest in the latest solutions and preventative approaches, whereas relatively few individual businesses can to the same degree.

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